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H.R. 5538, Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2017

Floor Situation

On Tuesday, July 12, 2016, the House will begin consideration of H.R. 5538, the Department of Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2017, under a structured rule.  H.R. 5538 was introduced by Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA) on June 21, 2016, and was ordered reported by the Committee on Appropriations by a vote of 31-18 on June 15, 2016. 


Summary

H.R. 5538 provides a total of $32.095 billion in total discretionary budget authority for the Department of Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and related agencies, for fiscal year (FY) 2017, a decrease of $64 million from the FY 2016 enacted level and $1 billion below the President’s request.

The major provisions of the bill are as follows:

Title I—Department of the Interior

The bill provides a total of $12.049 billion for the Department of the Interior, which is $130.6 million below the FY 2017 budget request, including funding for:

Bureau of Land Management (BLM): The bill provides a total of $1.23 billion for the BLM, a decrease of $9.7 million below the FY 2016 enacted level. BLM programs include: soil, water, and air management, rangeland management, wild horse and burro management, recreation management, resource protection and maintenance, resource management planning, the national landscape conservation system, and other various programs.[1]

Oregon and California grant lands: The bill provides $106.9 million for the Oregon and California grant lands, $749,000 below the FY 2016 level and equal to the budget request.[2]

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Resource Management: The bill provides $1.26 billion for resource management, $16.2 million above the FY 2016 enacted level and $54.9 million below the budget request. This includes funding for: ecological services, the National Wildlife Refuge System, migratory bird management, and other various programs.[3]

Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund: The bill provides $55.6 million for the Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund, $2.095 million above the FY 2016 enacted level and the budget request. The Fund provides grants to States and territories for endangered species recovery actions on non-Federal lands and provides funds for non-Federal land acquisition to facilitate habitat protection.[4]

National Wildlife Refuge Fund: The Fund makes payments in lieu of taxes based on their fair market value to counties in which Service lands are located. All payments are estimated to be $5.5 million in FY 2017 from the net refuge receipts estimated to be collected in FY 2016.[5]

State and Tribal Wildlife Grants: The bill provides $62.57 million for State and Tribal Wildlife Grants, $2 million above the FY 2016 enacted level and $4.4 million below the budget request. The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants Program provides grants to States and Indian tribes, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the territories, to conserve fish and wildlife that are at risk of being listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).[6]

National Park Service (NPS): The bill provides $2.435 billion for the Operation of NPS, an increase of $65.4 million above the FY 2016 enacted level. The National Park Service has stewardship responsibilities for the protection and preservation of the heritage resources of the national park system. The system, consisting of 410 separate and distinct units, is recognized globally as a leader in park management and resource preservation.[7]

National Recreation and Preservation: The bill provides $62.6 million for the National Recreation and Preservation account, equal to the FY 2016 enacted level and $8.24 million above the budget request. The account provides funding for outdoor recreation planning, preservation of cultural and national heritage resources, technical assistance to Federal, State and local agencies, and administration of Historic Preservation Fund grants.[8]

Historic Preservation Fund: The bill provides $78.4 million for Historic Preservation, $13 million above the FY 2016 enacted level and $9 million below the budget request. The Fund supports the State historic preservation offices to perform a variety of functions. These include State management and administration of existing grant obligations; review and advice on Federal projects and actions; determinations and nominations to the National Register; Tax Act certifications; and technical preservation services.[9]

Centennial Challenge: The bill provides $30 million for the Centennial Challenge matching grant program, a large component of the Service’s Centennial Initiative. According to the Committee, $15 million in Centennial Challenge funds provided to the Service in FY 2016 was matched with $33 million from more than 90 partner organizations nationwide. These funds are now financing 69 projects to improve visitor services at more than 63 parks in 38 States the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.[10]

United States Geological Survey (USGS): The bill provides $1.1 billion for the USGS, $18 million above the FY 2016 enacted level. Within this amount, the bill prioritizes funding for programs dealing with the earthquake early warning system and the launch of “Landsat 9”.[11]

Wildland Firefighting and Prevention – In total, the bill provides $3.9 billion for wildland firefighting and prevention programs, $243 million above the FY 2016 enacted level. The bill fully funds the 10-year average for wildland fire suppression costs for both the Department of the Interior and the Forest Service and provides $575 million for hazardous fuels management, which is $30 million above the FY 2016 level.[12]

Native American Programs: The bill provides $2.9 billion for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Education, $72 million above the FY 2016 level.  The Indian Health Service (IHS) is funded at $5.1 billion, an increase of $271 million.[13] Some of these funding provisions are included in Title III in addition to Title I of the bill.

Departmental Offices of the Secretary: The bill provides $749.4 million for Departmental Operations, $27.6 million above the FY 2016 enacted level and $471 million above the budget request.  The large increase above the budget request is to fully fund county payments in lieu of taxes (“PILT”) at $480 million.  The Office of the Secretary supports a wide-range of Departmental business, policy, and oversight functions.[14]

Title II—Environmental Protection Agency

The bill provides a total of $7.98 billion for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which is $164 million below the FY 2016 enacted level and $291 million below the budget request. Within the EPA, regulatory programs are cut $43 million below the current level and $187 million below the budget request. In addition, staffing levels at the EPA are held to 15,000, the lowest level since 1989. According to the Committee, these reductions will help the agency streamline operations, and focus its activities on core duties, rather than unnecessary regulatory expansion.[15]

The bill includes the following provisions in an attempt to prevent and stop the implementation of certain EPA programs.[16] Specifically, the bill:

  • Prohibits the EPA from implementing new greenhouse gas regulations for new and existing power plants;
  • Prohibits the EPA from making changes to the definition of “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act;
  • Prohibits the EPA from making changes to the definition of “fill material;”
  • Prohibits the EPA from imposing duplicative financial assurance requirements;
  • Prohibits new methane requirements;
  • Requires a report on the backlog of mining permits awaiting approval; and
  • Prevents the EPA from regulating the lead content of ammunition and fishing tackle.

Lead in Drinking Water: To help address the ongoing problem of lead in drinking water across the U.S., which can cause dangerous health risks, the bill provides additional legal authority allowing states to provide debt relief in areas with elevated levels of lead in drinking water.  The bill also provides targeted increases for water infrastructure programs such as:

  • $2.1 billion for the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRFs), including an increase of $207 million over the current level for the Drinking Water SRF;
  • $50 million for the new Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation (WIFIA) program;
  • $109.7 million for state grants, a $7.7 million increase above the current level, to improve operations and oversight of drinking water systems; and
  • $6.5 million, the full requested amount, for integrated planning activities within EPA’s Office of Water to assist communities as they plan to replace pipes.

Title III—Related Agencies

The bill provides a total of $12.069 billion for Related Agencies funded under the bill, which is $597.6 million below the FY 2017 budget estimate, including funding for:

U.S. Forest Service: The bill provides $5.3 billion for the Forest Service. More than half of this funding is targeted to wildland fire preparedness and suppression. The bill also includes a provision prohibiting the Forest Service or BLM from issuing new closures of public lands to hunting and recreational shooting, except in the case of public safety.[17]

Smithsonian Institution  The bill provides $863 million for the Smithsonian Institution, $23 million above the FY 2016 enacted level. The Smithsonian Institution is the world’s largest museum and research complex, with 19 museums and galleries, numerous research centers, libraries, archives, and the National Zoological Park. Funded by both private and Federal sources, the Smithsonian is unique in the Federal establishment.[18]

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: The bill provides $77.3 million for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, equal to the FY 2016 enacted level. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is an agency within the National Institutes of Health, which conducts certain research and worker training activities associated with the nation’s Hazardous Substance Superfund program.[19]

National Endowment for the Arts: The bill provides $149.85 million for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), $1.9 million above the FY 2016 level and equal to the budget request.[20]

National Endowment for the Humanities: The bill provides $149.85 million for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), $1.9 million above the FY 2016 level and equal to the budget request.[21]

Title IV—General Provisions[22]

Title IV includes, among others, the following general provisions:

  • Section 416 requires the President to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations no later than 120 days after the FY 2018 budget is submitted to Congress describing in detail all Federal agency obligations and expenditures for climate change programs and activities in FYs 2016 and 2017.
  • Section 417 continues a provision prohibiting the use of funds to promulgate or implement any regulation requiring the issuance of permits under title V of the Clean Air Act for carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, water vapor, or methane emissions.
  • Section 418 continues a provision prohibiting the use of funds to implement any provision in a rule if that provision requires mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from manure management systems.
  • Section 427 prohibits the use of funds to develop, adopt, implement, administer, or enforce a change or supplement to a rule or guidance documents pertaining to the definition of waters under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
  • Section 430 prohibits EPA from using funds to develop, propose, finalize, implement, enforce, or administer any regulation that would establish new financial responsibility requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA).
  • Section 431 prohibits EPA from using funds to develop, issue, implement, or enforce any greenhouse gas New Source Performance Standards on any new or existing source that is an electric utility generating unit.
  • Section 439 prohibits the use of funds to develop, propose, finalize, implement, or enforce any rule or guideline to address methane emissions from sources in the oil and natural gas sector under section 111(b) or (d) of the Clean Air Act, and proposed guidelines from September 18, 2015.
  • Section 445 prohibits the use of funds to list the lesser prairie chicken under the Endangered Species Act.
  • Section 447 addresses the Old and Middle River reverse flow operations in California.
  • Section 448 addresses authorizing increased Old and Middle River reverse flows in California during certain times.
  • Section 449 addresses certain water rights and water supply deliveries in California.
  • Section 450 prohibits funds to implement the San Joaquin River Restoration program.
  • Section 451 prohibits funds for instream flow purchases in California carried out by the Bureau of Reclamation at certain times.
  • Section 452 addresses water storage at New Melones Reservoir.
  • Section 453 prohibits the use of funds to designate national monuments in certain counties.

Background

The bill provides regular annual appropriations for the Department of the Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation and the Central Utah Project), the Environmental Protection Agency, and for other related agencies, including the Forest Service, the Indian Health Service, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.

According to Chairman Rogers, “This bill invests in federal programs to help address critical current needs and to guarantee a brighter future for our nation. These programs promote the responsible use of our natural resources, fight devastating wildfires, and improve the quality of life for families across the country. Further, the bill reins in federal bureaucracy to stop many harmful and unnecessary regulations that destroy economic opportunity and kill jobs.”[23]


Amendments

  1. Rep. Kathy Castor (D-FL) – This amendment matches the budget request for Law Enforcement of the National Wildlife Refuge System.
  2. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) – This amendment increases funding for the Operation of the National Park System (ONPS) account by $2,500,000, and decreases funding for the Departmental Operations Account for the Department of Interior by $2,500,000.
  3. Rep. Joe Courtney (D-CT) – This amendment funds the New England National Scenic Trail at $300,000 within the Operation of the National Park System.
  4. Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-VA) – This amendment provides a distribution of funds among Appalachian states for reclamation of abandoned mine lands in conjunction with economic and community development, offset by funds from the Environmental Programs and Management account.
  5. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM) – This amendment decreases and increases funding to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) by $1 million to require that the BIA to report, identify and adjudicate to landowners egress and ingress easements where they do not exist for landowners on land parcels adjudicated under the Pueblo Lands Act of 1924.
  6. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM) – This amendment decreases and increases funding to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) by $1 million to require the BIA to update and digitize its inventory of rights-of-way records and to make them publicly available in a commonly used mapping format.
  7. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) – This amendment reduces the amount appropriated to the Department of the Interior—Office of the Secretary— Departmental Operations by $6,000,000 in order to fund the World War I Centennial Commission authorized by the World War I Centennial Commission Act (36 U.S.C. 1 note).
  8. Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN) – This amendment reprograms already appropriated funds to create an Office of Good Jobs for the Department of Interior.
  9. Rep. Donald Norcross (D-NJ) – This amendment adds $13,060,000 to the Hazardous Substance Superfund (equal to President's Budget request) and reduces Payments In Lieu of Taxes by the same amount.
  10. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) – This amendment strikes lines 4 through 19 on page 67.
  11. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) – This amendment strikes Section 122.
  12. Rep. Kathy Castor (D-FL) – This amendment strikes section 124.
  13. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA) – This amendment strikes Section 127 of the Act, which would delay the finalization and implementation of the proposed rule for air quality control, reporting, and compliance in specific offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic Ocean.
  14. Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO) – This amendment eliminates funding for the Air, Climate and Energy Research Program under EPA.
  15. Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) – This amendment increases the EPA's Inspector General fund by $10,038,000 to bring up to President's request and decreases the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Programs and Management fund by $14,000,000.
  16. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) – This amendment redirects funds from EPA bureaucracy to the Forest Service Hazardous Fuels account in order to prevent dangerous wildfires.
  17. Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR) – This amendment removes funds from the EPA bureaucracy, and places them into the US Forest Service’s Forest and Rangeland Research Account, which funds the Forest Products Laboratory and Forest Inventory and Analysis, among other programs.
  18. Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) – This amendment ensures implementation of the EPA’s Final Rule on the Disposal of Coal Combustion Residuals from Electric Utilities is consistent with Executive Order 12898.
  19. Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D-CT) – This amendment directs $10,000,000 to Brownfields projects within State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG) from Superfund cleanup to help states leverage $18 for $1 expended for the purpose of cleaning up brownfield properties, such as abandoned factories or former dry cleaning establishments, in their communities.
  20. Rep. Gary Palmer (R-AL) – This amendment eliminates funding for Diesel Emission Reduction Grants and sends the savings to the spending reduction account.
  21. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM) – This amendment decreases and increases State and Tribal Assistance Grants by $6 million to direct the EPA to work with the affected States and Indian tribes to implement a longterm monitoring program for water quality of the Animas and San Juan Rivers in response to the Gold King Mine spill.
  22. Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-MI) – This amendment removes language that would exempt a number of potentially damaging activities in National Forests from consideration, including public notice and comment and alternatives analysis, under the National Environmental Policy Act.
  23. Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC) – This amendment transfers $4,762,000 from the Commission of Fine Arts and the Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs grant program to the bill's Spending Reduction Account.
  24. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) – This amendment strikes Section 418, which would prevent EPA from monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from manure management systems.
  25. Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-PA) – This amendment strikes section 425, which prohibits the EPA from acting on changes to the definition of "fill material" and "discharge of fill material" under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
  26. Rep. Brenda Lawrence (D-MI) – This amendment strikes Section 427.
  27. Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) – This amendment strikes language that would delay implementation of the EPA Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule.
  28. Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-CA) – This amendment strikes section 430 of Interior Appropriations bill for FY17.
  29. Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) – This amendment strikes section 431.
  30. Rep. Scott Peters (D-CA) – This amendment strikes Section 434 to allow the EPA to regulate ozonedepleting substances under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program to improve public health and fight the root causes of climate change.
  31. Rep. Scott Peters (D-CA) – This amendment strikes Section 436 to allow federal agencies to use the social cost of carbon in rule makings and guidance documents.
  32. Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) – This amendment strikes Section 437 of the Act.
  33. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) – This amendment strikes section 439, regarding methane emissions.
  34. Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) – This amendment allows the Interior Department to proceed with updating royalty rates and valuation for federal coal, oil, and gas by striking Section 440.
  35. Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-CA) – This amendment strikes section 447.
  36. Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-CA) – This amendment strikes section 448.
  37. Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-CA) – This amendment strikes section 449.
  38. Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-CA) – This amendment strikes section 450.
  39. Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-CA) – This amendment strikes section 451.
  40. Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-CA) – This amendment strikes Sec. 452.
  41. Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) – This amendment strikes Sec. 453.
  42. Rep. Diane Black (R-TN) – This amendment prohibits the EPA from using funds to implement, administer, or enforce the agency’s “Phase 2” fuel efficiency and emissions standards, or any rule with respect to glider kits and glider vehicles.
  43. Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) – This amendment imposes a 1 percent across-the-board spending cut to the bill.
  44. Rep. Charles Boustany (R-LA) – This amendment prohibits the Secretary of the Interior to implement, administer, or enforce any rule or guidance substantially similar to the proposed guidance that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management made available for public comment on September 22, 2015, regarding financial assurances for oil and gas operations on the Outer Continental Shelf.
  45. Rep. Charles Boustany (R-LA) – This amendment ensures that no money is permitted for the implementation of the Well Control Rule.
  46. Rep. David Brat (R-VA) – This amendment sunsets Land and Water Conservation Fund grants with states or local government units after 20 years.
  47. Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO) – This amendment prevents the Department of Interior from partnering with private organizations to create or expand national heritage areas in southeast Colorado.
  48. Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX) – This amendment restricts funds from being used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to hire new employees under the Title 42 Special Pay Program or transfer existing employees into the Title 42 Special Pay Program authorized for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
  49. Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL) – This amendment prohibits any funds from being used to develop or propose legislation to redirect funds allocated from the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA).
  50. Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL) – This amendment prohibits funding from being used to implement, administer, or enforce the Obama administration’s National Ocean Policy.
  51. Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-ND) – This amendment ensures no funds are provided to finalize or implement the Fish and Wildlife Service rule entitled “Management of Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights.”
  52. Rep. Rick Crawford (R-AR) – This amendment prohibits the EPA from enforcing or implementing the Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) rule on farming and ranching operations.
  53. Rep. Rick Crawford (R-AR) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds in support of grassroots advocacy campaigns intended to persuade the outcome of legislation pending in Congress or state legislatures.
  54. Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL) – This amendment prevents any funds from being used for the Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations at the EPA and reduces the Environmental Programs and Management account by $4,235,000.
  55. Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used to implement, administer, or enforce a new regulatory action of $100 million or more.
  56. Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) – This amendment requires the EPA to satisfy regulatory planning and review requirements established by the Clinton and Obama Administrations.
  57. Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) – This amendment prohibits the Environmental Protection Agency from using any funds to take retaliatory, or EPA described “backstop” actions, against any of the six states in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed in the event that a state does not meet the goals mandated by the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load.
  58. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds to implement, administer, or enforce the draft EPA-USGS Technical Report entitled "Protecting Aquatic Life from Effects of Hydrologic Alteration."
  59. Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) – This amendment prohibits the installation of new ozone monitors by the Environmental Protection Agency.
  60. Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC) – This amendment prohibits officers and employees of the EPA from official travel by airplane.
  61. Rep. William Huizenga (R-MI) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds to pay attorney fees in a civil suit under the Endangered Species Act pursuant to a court order that states such fees were calculated at an hourly rate in excess of $125 per hour.
  62. Rep. Evan Jenkins (R-WV) – This amendment prohibits funding for the EPA to develop, finalize, promulgate, implement, administer, or enforce any rule under section 112 of the Clean Air Act that applies to glass manufacturers that do not use continuous furnaces.
  63. Rep. David Jolly (R-FL) – This amendment ensures none of the funds made available by the Act may be used to research, investigate, or study offshore drilling in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico Planning Area.
  64. Rep. Steve King (R-IA) – This amendment ensures that no funds appropriated by this Act can be used to implement, administer, or enforce Davis-Bacon prevailing rate wage requirements.
  65. Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-CA) – This amendment prohibits the use of federal funds to remove four privately-owned dams on the Klamath River in California and Oregon.
  66. Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds to implement, administer, or enforce the final rule entitled "Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal and Indian Lands".
  67. Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds to implement or enforce the threatened species or endangered species listing of any plant or wildlife that has not undergone a periodic 5 year review as required by section 4(c)(2) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973.
  68. Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-CO) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds to implement or enforce the threatened species listing of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse.
  69. Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R-GA) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used to regulate trailers under the Clean Air Act.
  1. Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) – This amendment prohibits funding to finalize, implement, or enforce EPA proposed rulemaking regarding in situ uranium production.
  2. Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-NJ) – This amendment limits permit inspection regulations with respect to the export of squid, octopus, and cuttlefish products.
  3. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-FL) – This amendment provides that none of the funds from this act shall be used to carry out seismic airgun testing or seismic airgun surveys in the OCS Planning Areas located within the EEZ bordering the State of Florida.
  4. Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the Department of Interior to treat any Gray Wolf in the 48 contiguous states as an endangered or threatened species under the Endangered Species Act after June 13, 2017.
  5. Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA) – This amendment prohibits the use of funds by EPA to issue and expand new regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) that would apply to Animal Feeding Operations.
  6. Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA) – This amendment restores $1,000,000 for the Wolf Livestock Loss Demonstration Program and is offset by reducing funds for EPA Environmental Programs & management by $1,000,000.
  7. Rep. Gary Palmer (R-AL) – This amendment ensures that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used for the Environmental Protection Agency's Criminal Enforcement Division.
  8. Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) – This amendment removes federal protections for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
  9. Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) – This amendment removes federal protections for the Mexican Wolf under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and would prevent the expansion of the species habitat outside of its historic range.
  10. Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) – This amendment ensures none of the funds made available by this Act may be used to develop, administer, purchase, acquire, or operate an unmanned aircraft system owned by the Department of Interior or the Environmental Protection Agency to perform surveying, mapping, or collecting remote sensing data.
  11. Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) – This amendment reduces Appropriations made in this Act for the Environmental Protection Agency by 17 percent.
  12. Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) – This amendment ensures none of the funds made available by this Act shall be used to give formal notification under, or prepare, propose, implement, administer, or enforce any rule or recommendation pursuant to, section 115 of the Clean Air Act.
  13. Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used to finalize, implement, administer or enforce EPA’s proposed rule on Accidental Release Prevention Requirements: Rink Management Program Under the Clean Air Act.
  14. Rep. Tom Price (R-GA) – This amendment ensures none of the funds in the underlying bill will be made available to carry out any new major rule as described in subparagraph (A) of section 804(2) of title 5, United States Code.
  15. Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-TX) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the proposed rule entitled “Clean Energy Incentive Program Design Details.”
  16. Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO) – This amendment blocks the use of funds to carry out the third sentence of section 107(f)(1) (CERCLA).
  17. Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO) – This amendment blocks funding from going towards environmental education grants under section 6 of the national environmental education act.
  18. Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR) – This amendment prevents funds from being used to enforce a federal court decision that stopped implementation of the 2014 EA and take permit plan for double-crested cormorants.
  19. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (R-GA) – This amendment restricts federal agencies from using funds to pay legal fees under any lawsuit settlement regarding a case that arises under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act.
  20. Rep. Don Young (R-AK) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used to finalize, implement, or enforce new regulations on offshore Arctic energy exploration and development.
  21. Rep. Don Young (R-AK) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used to implement a final plan to designate areas of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska as wilderness.
  22. Rep. Don Young (R-AK) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used to implement a final rule by the Fish and Wildlife Service and a proposed rule from the National Park Service.
  23. Rep. Don Young (R-AK) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used to remove 3 Arctic Sales from the 2017-2022 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Proposed Program.
  24. Rep. Don Young (R-AK) – This amendment prohibits funds from this Act to be used by the Department of Interior to change existing placer mining plans of operations in regard to re-vegetation.
  25. Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY) – This amendment prohibits funds from being used to designate a National Marine Monument in the EEZ via presidential proclamation.
  26. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) – This amendment prevents funds from being used to block science-based protections for imperiled wildlife that has or may need Endangered Species Act protections.
  27. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) – This amendment requires that no funds made available by this Act be used in contravention of Executive Order 13653 or Executive Order 13693.
  28. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) – This amendment requires that no funds made available by this Act be used authorize, permit, or conduct geological or geophysical activities in support of oil, gas, or methane hydrate exploration and development in the Atlantic.
  29. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) – This amendment states none of the funds made available by this Act may be used to implement or enforce section 120, 425, 426, or 427.
  30. Rep. Lois Capps (D-CA) – This amendment prohibits funds to be used to process any application for a permit to drill or a permit to modify that would authorize use of hydraulic fracturing or acid well stimulation treatment in the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf.
  31. Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ)—This amendment prevents funds in the bill from being used to abolish law enforcement offices at the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.
  32. Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY)—This amendment prohibits the use of funds by a State in contravention of the Great Lakes Compact, an interstate compact ratified by Congress detailing how the States will work together to manage and protect the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin.
  33. Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-CA)—This amendment prevents funds from being used in contravention to a 2009 Interior Department Secretarial Order on climate change.
  34. Rep. Mark Pocan (D-WI)—This amendment protects the Administration's climate change and environmental sustainability executive order to ensure that no funds be used to weaken the executive order within this Act.
  35. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO)—This amendment prohibits use of funds to pursue any additional legal ways to transfer Federal lands to private owners in contravention of existing law.
  36. Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA)—This amendment prohibits any funds from being made available to implement the proposed rule for dog management in the Golden Gate National Recreational Area.
  37. Rep. Niki Tsongas (D-MA)—This amendment prevents a provision of the bill that would block BLM resource management plans from going into effect if failing to implement the plans would limit BLM’s ability to meet its multiple use obligations, including providing opportunities for hunting, fishing, and outdoor recreation.
  38. Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL)—This amendment appropriates funds to conduct a study with existing funds on how Coastal Barrier Resource Area zones affect the value of private property.
  39. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)—This amendment increases funding for the Historic Preservation Fund by $1,000,000 to be directed to the State historic preservation offices. Reduces funding for the Department of Interior Departmental Operations by $1,000,000.
  40. Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-SC)—This amendment increases funds for historic preservation grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities by $2 million and reduces Office of the Secretary by the same amount.
  41. Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN)—The amendment increases the Department of the Interior’s Historic Preservation Fund account by $2M, specifically for use in awarding competitive grants to preserve the sites and stories of the Civil Rights movement.
  42. Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT)—This amendment increases BIA funding for dirt school bus routes by $1.5M. The cost is offset by decreasing EPA's Environment Programs & Management fund by $1.75M
  43. Rep. Dan Kildee (D-MI)—This amendment provides funding to help provide fresh drinking water to communities that have been impacted by lead in their drinking water.
  44. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL)—This amendment increases funding for the National Estuary Program by $468,000.
  45. Rep. Donald Norcross (D-NJ)—This amendment adds $15,282,000 to the Hazardous Substance Superfund.
  46. Rep. Dan Kildee (D-MI)—This amendment allows states with communities that have declared an emergency related to lead in drinking water to use more of their Drinking Water State Revolving Funds to address lead in drinking water public health issues.
  47.  Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO)—This amendment increases and then decreases the amount provided for Wildland Fire Management by $2 million in order to apply additional funds to the Volunteer Fire Assistance grant program.
  48. Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY)—This amendment reduces funding for the Smithsonian Institution by $300,000 then increases funding by the same amount to ensure that the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center receives the $300,000 increase requested in the President’s FY17 Budget.
  49. Rep. John Duncan (R-TN)—This amendment provides that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used to destroy any buildings or structures on Midway Island.
  50. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ)—This amendment prohibits funds for the Fish and Wildlife Service to continue to prohibit tubing, waterskiing and wake boarding in an area on Lake Havasu.
  51. Rep. Randy Weber (R-TX)—This amendment prohibits the use of funds by EPA in contravention of the Clean Air Act provision requiring EPA to evaluate the impact of its actions with respect to jobs in America.
  52. Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY)—This amendment prohibits funds made available by this Act from being used to lease or purchase new light duty vehicles unless those vehicles meet the requirements of President Obama’s May 24, 2011 Executive Order on Federal Fleet Performance.
  53. Rep. Ruben Gallego (D-AZ)—This amendment prohibits funds from being used to issue grazing permits or leases in contravention of BLM regulations.
  54. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL)—This amendment prohibits the government from entering into a contract with an entity that discloses, as it is required to by the Federal Acquisition Regulation, that it has been convicted of fraud or another criminal offense in the last three years in connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public contract or subcontract. Prohibits the government from contracting with entities that have been notified of any delinquent Federal taxes for which the liability remains unsatisfied.
  55. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX)—This amendment expresses support for National Historic Areas and for continuation of national policy of preserving for public use historic sites, buildings, and objects of national significance.
  56. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX)—This amendment prohibits the use of funds to be used to eliminate the Urban Wildlife Refuge Partnership.
  57. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX)—This amendment prohibits funds to be used to limit outreach programs administered by the Smithsonian Institution.
  58. Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR)—This amendment prevents funds from being used to destroy records regarding, related to, or generated by the recently closed Inorganic Section of the USGS Energy Geochemistry Lab in Lakewood, CO, which has a 20- year track record of data manipulation.
  59. Rep. Glen Grothman (R-WI)—This amendment eliminates $100 million in funding for the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) Grants.
  60. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA)—This amendment prevents funds in the underlying bill from being used to take steps to significantly change operations at the Arecibo Observatory in Arecibo, Puerto Rico.
  61. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO)—This amendment prevents funds from being used for Surgical Sterilization of Wild Horses.
  62. Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-PA)—This amendment strikes section 426, which prohibits Federal Water Pollution Control Act funds from being used to require permits for certain discharge of dredged or fill material activities.

Cost

If enacted, H.R. 5538 would result in discretionary budget authority of $32.095 billion.


Staff Contact

For questions or further information please contact Jake Vreeburg with the House Republican Policy Committee by email or at 5-0190.

 

[1] See House Report 114-632 at 9-12.
[2] Id. at 12.
[3] Id. at 13.
[4] Id. at 21.
[5] Id.
[6] Id. at 22.
[7] Id. at 23.
[8] Id. at 31.
[9] Id. at 33.
[10] Id. at 34-35.
[11] Id. at 35.
[12] See Appropriations Press Release, “Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2017 Interior and Environment Bill,” May 24, 2016.
[13] Id.
[14] See House Report 114-632 at 49.
[15] Id.
[16]See Appropriations Press Release, “Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2017 Interior and Environment Bill,” May 24, 2016.
[17] Id.
[18] Id.
[19] See House Report 114-632 at 91.
[20] Id. at 99.
[21] Id. at 101.
[22] Id. at 106-107.
[23] See Press Release, “Appropriations Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2017 Interior and Environment Bill,” June 15, 2016

114th Congress